Texas Coastal Impact Assistance Program (CIAP)

Daisetta Sinkhole Impact Study

The Daisetta sinkhole impact study was funded with qualified outer continental shelf oil and gas revenues by the Coastal Impact Assistance Program, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and U.S. Department of the Interior.

On May 2, 2008, a sinkhole, measuring approximately 200 meters in diameter and 30 meters in depth, collapsed without apparent warning on the northwest flank of the Hull salt dome within the city limits of Daisetta. Concentric fissures that formed around the sinkhole were within a few meters of Farm-to-Market Road 770, the main street through Daisetta.

Sinkholes have long been known to be associated with salt domes. Salt domes across the Texas Upper Coast region have the potential to increase groundwater salinities in the Gulf Coast aquifer by direct dissolution and transport of soluble dome minerals and by providing pathways for groundwater mixing between shallow freshwater and deep saline-water aquifers. The purpose of the study was to conduct reconnaissance gravitational assessments in order to form a better understanding of how salt domes react to various forces. Information collected from the study will be used to ensure that groundwater, hydrocarbon resources and extraction, and waste disposal are not adversely impacted by sinkhole development.

Project Location

Location City of Daisetta, Liberty County, Texas
Latitude/Longitude N 30.1133/ -94.6447

Project Costs

Total Project Cost $9,958.53
2007 CIAP Funds $9,958.53

Final Reports

Preliminary Investigations of Subsidence, Collapse, and Potential for Continued Growth of the Daisetta Sinkhole, Liberty County, Texas PDF document

Site Maps and Photo Gallery

Map PDF document
PhotosPDF document

Last Updated: 3/16/2016 10:37:02 AM